August 30, 2012

Do you know how to prepare a meal for the next trip?


Traveling in an adventure style will let you have an experience to eat outside such as campaign in a forest or a mountain . So, learning how to make easy camping meals can save you a ton of time on your next camping trip. Though outdoor cooking can be fun, it’s never good to miss out on other outdoor activities because you’re stuck making food for everyone. Use the following guidelines to minimize the work and time it takes to make great meals on your next camping trip.


Foil is Your Friend
If there’s one essential item you need to make camp cooking easier, it’s aluminum foil. Almost any food item can be cooked quickly and effectively using it. Simply wrap the food item in the foil, and place it on a grate over the campfire. Some of the most popular foods to cook with aluminum foil include hamburger meant for burgers and pasta dishes, whole potatoes, almost any type of vegetable, and chicken parts. Obviously, cooking times will vary depending on what you’re making. A good rule of thumb for this easy, all purpose campfire cooking method is to assume cooking times to be similar to that of using a grill. Read another post on uses for aluminum foil while camping to learn more.


Preparation Before the Trip
Before the invention of the microwave, people used more primitive heating methods to cook leftovers. Following this logic, preparing certain foods in advance can seriously cut down on time and effort spent cooking during your next camping trip. Before you leave, make some simple, hearty foods that fit nicely in the cooler and can be reheated easily over a campfire. Scrambled eggs, spaghetti, Hamburger Helper, and biscuits can all be cooked at home and stashed safely in Tupperware containers for later use. Best of all, their reheating time at the campsite is minimal, giving you plenty of extra time to enjoy the beautiful spot you’re camping at – wherever it may be.

Use a Time Tested Cooking Tool
Let’s face it; non-campers are a little spoiled when it comes to cooking. With microwaves, stoves, and electric ovens at their disposal, they can prepare food a lot more quickly and easily. But you do have an advantage when it comes to campsite cooking; easy camping meals can be made even easier with the use of a Dutch Oven. An all purpose cooking vessel, the Dutch Oven has a tight fitting lid to seal in heat and a very sturdy construction. Almost anything that fits in one will cook nicely. Some popular easy camping meals to make in it include chili, beef stew, and just about any soup you can come up with.
With a little preparation, making easy meals while camping really isn’t all that tough. So, instead of slaving over a hot fire for lengthy amounts of time on your next camping trip, employ the tricks above to allow more time for fun.

August 22, 2012

ACTIVETRAVEL ASIA release more options for summer promotion 2012


Accommodation is one of biggest concerns before traveling? It is turning to dust now with ATA’s Summer Promotion 2012



Travelers will get 1 night at 3 Star Hotel in Hanoi Old Quarter (Calypso Boutique Hotel) for FREE. Deluxe room with luxury equipments and services are designed to ensure that you will have the unforgettable trip with ACTIVETRAVEL ASIA.

In case you cannot visit Hanoi or you would like to arrange accommodation on your own, we are delighted to offer a dinner for 2 people at every destinations on your tour.

Besides, we have just deciced to add more option by adding 75 minutes massage body at Touch Hanoi Spa. By choosing suitable massage treament, we aim to help travellers feel relax after active time of running, trekking, or ridding on road.  

This promotion is valid for bookings from May 01, 2012 to Sep 30, 2012, applied for tours which cover Vietnam in its itinerary and price for over $500. 

Summer promotion provides all adventure lovers real experiences in Vietnam without concerning about accommodation, food, and activities. 

We hope to meet you there!

ACTIVETRAVEL ASIA, offers a wide selection of Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia adventure tours, including hiking and trekking, biking, motorcycling, kayaking, overland tours and family travel packages. Our tour packages and custom itineraries will take you through exotic destinations to really experience the culture, history and nature of Asia.

August 18, 2012

Chol Chnam Thmay Festival


The Chol Chnam Thmay Festival is the biggest festival of the Khmer people which can be found in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand...It  is also the New Year festival of the Khmer people as Tet of the Viet people. It is held at the pagodas and local homes.he festival is prepared very carefully. Khmer people clean and redecorate their house and buy necessary food for the holidays.




Parents, grandparents and children gather and sit front of the altar. They stop all farm work, and relax. The three festival days are held in a joyful and exciting atmosphere.

The first day is called Thngay Chol Chnam Thmay. This ceremony can be held sooner or later in day, as long as it will be in good time, according to the the Khmer’s opinion.

The second day is called Thngay Von-Boch. Each family ​​offers morning and lunch meals for the monks.

The third day named Thngay Large-Sak, main festival day also the last day of the festival, similar to the first two days, after offering the monks breakfast, people make a bath for Buddha to clean out the old things, dust of the old year, to welcome the new year with a clean body.

In the evening, there are fireworks and other activities, such as kite flying and fire dancing. The boys and girls perform the Roam Vong dance and sing Du Ke.

The Chol Chnam Thmay festival’s purpose is to see the end of hot sunny season and to welcome the rainy period. It shows the Khmer people’s aspirations to forget the old year’s misfortunes and hope better things in a new year.

August 11, 2012

Amazing Festival in Cambodia


Cambodia has a wealth of traditional and international festivals. Most of these are a time of great rejoicing for the predominantly rural populace, many of whom flock to the capital to join in the celebrations and witness the organized fireworks displays which accompany the festivals. It is at these times the nation unites with a shared common understanding of values and traditions and they are looked forward to with great expectation. Even in times of hardship people try even harder to make these times special. All the traditional festivals are influenced by the concepts of Buddhism, Hinduism and royal cultures. The following are the most important of the celebrations organized throughout the year.





Water festival (October or November)

This vast festival is probably the most extravagant festival in the calendar. Over three days starting with the last full moon day in October or the beginning of November up to a million people from all walks of life from all over the country flock to the banks of Tonle Sap and Mekong Rivers in Phnom Penh to watch hundreds of brightly colored boats with over 50 paddlers battle it out for top honors. The boat racing dates back to ancient times marking the strengths of the powerful Khmer marine forces during the Khmer empire. In the evening brightly decorated floats cruise along the river prior to and complimenting the fireworks displays. there is often a parallel festival at Angkor Wat and although it is smaller in scale it is just as impressive due to the backdrop of Angkor Wat.

August 07, 2012

10 reasons to choose Hanoi’s beer



Much has been written about beer - "bia hoi" in Vietnamese. It's a foamy, light-alcohol beer found mostly in northern Vietnam. Made fresh each day with few preservatives, the dregs are chucked down the gutter at close of business each day.

This quick turnover and easy brewing means it's exceptionally cheap -- about 20 cents a glass, though Vietnam's rapid inflation may see that rise before publication -- and the establishments that serve it are also relatively basic.

1. Bia hoi is cheaper

Far, far cheaper  than its Czech-inspired counterpart. Though both cost peanuts compared to most places back home there's a certain satisfaction in knowing your dozen beers cost only US$3.


2. People are friendlier

It's a rare night you'll spend with friends clustered round the low-slung plastic stools of a bia hoi where some blinking, red-faced bloke won't lurch up to your table to repeatedly grasp your hand and yell, "Helloo! Hello! Helloh?" then invite you to join his mates for some rounds of cheap, rice-based spirits.

Foreigner drink beer on the pavement of street in Hanoi Old Quater

3. You can relax 

Smoking, slurping, dumping chicken bones on the floor -- all are acceptable behavior here. Nay, they're encouraged.

4. The food

Some bia hois serve execrable rubbish, but plenty serve excellent, freshly prepared dishes for very little cost.


Banana flower salad (nom hoa chuoi), barbecued chicken (ga nuong) and fried rice (com rang) are stalwarts. Just watch out for the mixed hotpot (lau thap cam) or pig stomach (da day).

5. Interesting local spirits

Vodka Hanoi (cheap, rice-based vodka with a slightly greasy aftertaste) is a standard but many places also stock ruou ong den -- rice wine infused with the whole bees' nest, not just the nectar -- or ruou dua, rice wine left to ferment in a coconut shell (it tastes a hell of a lot better than Malibu, believe us).

The hangover's never worth it, mind.

6. Street life

Usually these beer barns are open-walled and tables and chairs often spill onto the street. You may get a lungful of motorbike exhaust with your fried spinach, but you get a nice view as well. Others back onto lakes or parks, or the Mausoleum.

7. Watery, weak, but unique

It's rare in the south but unheard of in the rest of the world. Fresh, brewed daily and cheaper than any other beer, anywhere. That has to count for something in a world of generic, international brands. And it's no more watery than Bud or Coors, anyway.

8. Colonial heritage

Think of this: the French colonial oppressors brought bia to Vietnam to stop people wrecking themselves on dodgy rice spirit.

This is where bia hois originally came from. The pilsner beer halls are a result of people studying in former communist nations back in the days when everyone still knew the words to the Internationale.


But the leftovers of colonial rule -- the bia hois -- are still working men’s brew halls while the results of the egalitarian international brotherhood are there mostly for the rapidly emerging middle class.

9. It's egalitarian

Bia hoi gets more egalitarian yet. A bia hoi can be nothing more than a tiny grandmother sat roadside with a table, chairs, a keg and a few glasses.

Using technology no more complicated than a rubber pipe she sucks some frothy beer from the keg, so you can usually have a drink morning, noon or night. As Vietnam modernizes, beer for breakfast has become less common, but it was once a grand tradition.

10. No hangover

Though some drinkers will vehemently disagree, bia hoi doesn't usually leave you with a pounding hangover.


It's low alcohol content means it takes a concerted effort to get drunk enough to feel dreadful the next day. Most problems come from people getting a stale batch, something you have to watch out for. Drinking at busy places is a better idea.


August 06, 2012

Classical dance in Cambodia


Classical Dance of Cambodia The epic poem of Rama (Ramayana) is believed to have been revealed to a Hindu holy man named Valmiki by Brahma, the god of creation. This religious literary work, dating from about ad 4, is known in various versions throughout India and Southeast Asia. In Cambodia, the story has been set to music and dance and performed by the Royal Ballet since the 18th century.



Although the epic is also known in the villages, where it is translated orally or dramatized in the popular shadow puppet theater, the ballet was traditionally a courtly art performed in the palace or for princely festivals. The music of the ballet is performed by the Pinpeat orchestra, which is made up of traditional xylophones, metallophones, horizontal gongs, drums, and cymbals.